24 Hours of Sunsets [infographic]

March 4, 2014 |  by  |  Recreation, Travel  |  1 Comment
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If there is one thing I love more than looking at the stars at night in Texas, it’s watching the sunset. I’ve seen a lot of gorgeous sunsets in my life, but seeing it in the Hill Country is by far one of the greatest experiences ever. I can remember sitting in the back of a pickup truck with my high school friends, talking about anything and everything while watching the sunset. It’s hard to think about all the negative things going on in your life when you just stop and take a moment to appreciate the beauty of the setting sun.

For those of you who don’t know, GMT stands for Greenwich Mean Time and it is the basis of every world time zone. There’s even a pretty great website that lets you compare GMT with a destination closer to where you live. For those of you in Texas like me, you can figure out our time – which is mostly Central Standard Time (CST) – by subtracting six hours from the GMT. According to that same website, GMT has been around since 1884 and is measured from the Greenwich Meridian Line at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England. (I bet you didn’t think I could use Greenwich that many times in one sentence.)

I haven’t been to many of the places on this list, but after seeing these spectacular pictures, my travel bucket list just got a whole lot longer. Maybe I’ll even find some nice stranger to watch the sunset with me. Who knows? [via]

 

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12 Myths About Sex [infographic]

March 4, 2014 |  by  |  Health  |  2 Comments
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Alright everyone, it’s time that we put all of that high school locker room hearsay to rest. Admittedly, I learned quite a lot from this infographic. At first I took it as a reflection of my own naivety before realizing that this infographic was made for a reason. These are common misconceptions that nobody really talks about because we’re afraid to admit that our sex lives do not live up to the glorified model of performance that has positioned itself as the norm.

So it turns out that all the amazing feats performed by those vigorous studs and voluptuous babes that we’ve all seen in those videos are just a fantasy. Not only that, but statistically a woman would be more attracted to you if you have a steady job and can make her laugh than if she heard those rumors about your big dimensions and that nuclear fusion reactor of stamina you got. There’s a large spectrum of sexual “achievement” out there and many false impressions on where the average person sits on this spectrum. Despite all of this, it doesn’t seem like anyone is enjoying sex any less though. So, what difference do the numbers make?

[Via]

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The History Of Smoking [Infographic]

March 3, 2014 |  by  |  Health, Lifestyle  |  No Comments
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Smoking tobacco has had a long and interesting history in our society. As popular as it has been for the last 5 centuries, the product is not without controversy.

First used by the Native Americans, it was quickly snatched up by Spanish colonists (1492) in order to propagate it’s splendor in the European nations. This commodity was soon adopted around the world as a social substance and in some cases as a symbol of class (snuff was used by Charles II and the French court by the 1660s). Manufacturing of tobacco began in Seville, Spain and then later in Virginia, increasing the readily available nature of the product.

Tobacco’s first enemy was found in 1830. The U.S. temperance movement created the first anti-tobacco association along with the Progressive movement’s other encouragements against drugs, alcohol, and other detriments to hygiene. Despite this, tobacco was still very popular and was even encouraged during wartime — cigarettes were included as rations during World War I and II.

It wasn’t until well into the 20th century that the link between smoking and cancer became absolutely clear. With this information, the image of tobacco changed. Larger warnings on cigarette packs were suddenly demanded, smoking was declared a cause of death, and devices like the nicotine patch and e-cigarettes were invented to create less dependence on the product.

[Ten Motives]

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Top Ten Causes of Death in the United States [infographic]

March 2, 2014 |  by  |  Food, Health, Lifestyle  |  3 Comments
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Death is something that we will all face at some point. When we’ll have to stare death in the face is a mystery. What is not a mystery, is what we can do to help us make sure we bring ourselves as close as we can get to coming to death on our own terms. We gotta stay healthy folks!

Diseases are on the rise and the causes are debatable. The most alarming piece of information is that the diseases that are highest on the list are the ones that do not typically occur in nature. It can be absolutely true that heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s could occur in nature — but it’s not likely.

Many of us are not as active or even eat as healthy as we should. Studies say all it takes is about 30 minutes a day of exercise to keep our hearts healthy. It can be tough fitting extra things into our schedules. But wouldn’t it be worth it to have healthier days with the people you love, doing the things you love to do?

Your health, for the most part, is in your hands. The lifestyle we live will have impacts on the life we have down the road and influence lives around us. We can maintain our health and use our habits to increase awareness for healthy living for those around us. [via]

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The Student Lifecycle [infographic]

March 1, 2014 |  by  |  Education  |  No Comments
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How many other college students remember the painful process of applying to college? I sure do. And I only applied to one college. (And got accepted, because I’m a boss.)

With so much information to take in, it can be a little overwhelming and downright frustrating. I remember going to Texas State’s website for the first time and spending 20 minutes on the home page because my computer decided to quit working. Had I not gone to that page, maybe this crisis could have been avoided. Or maybe my computer was just a piece of junk (rest in peace, HP 17″ general laptop)…

But it doesn’t matter, because I blame Texas State’s website! So take notes, universities of America, because this board game style infographic will help you capture the hearts of the prospective students you’re after. [via]

 

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