Oscar History By Numbers [infographic]

February 12, 2014 |  by  |  Entertainment, Movies  |  No Comments
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My cinematic palate isn’t particularly sophisticated. I’m a big comedy fan myself and the majority of movies I see in theaters are animated or unapologetically cheesy. But every once in a while I’ll get in the mood for something a little more artfully crafted and generally speaking, Oscar nominated films are going to deliver that.

The 2014 Academy Awards are fast approaching so obviously things are getting heated in the cinematic world. My twitter feed is blowing up with wild speculation via countless over-zealous twenty-somethings who consider themselves film connoisseurs. Jennifer Lawrence is excessively praised by all and everyone’s waiting anxiously to see if Leo finally gets his long-awaited award. It’s an exciting time in Hollywood and for movie lovers everywhere.

This infographic breaks down things like the ‘nominations to wins’ ratio for Best Pictures and how many female Best Directors there have been (spoiler alert: it’s one.) Other fun facts include that comparatively speaking, an absurd amount of people with the name ‘John’ have won Academy Awards, and only 12 movies over 3 hours long have won best picture, the longest being ‘Gone with the Wind.’ I’m excited to see what this year’s ceremony has in store and whether or not the winners will hold true to the trends in this piece. [via] empire-oscars-by-numbers-infographic

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The Secrets of Happy Couples [infographic]

February 12, 2014 |  by  |  Lifestyle  |  1 Comment
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In case you forgot, Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. And whether you’re excited or horrified by this looming holiday, today’s infographic gives us insight into what happy relationships can look like. We probably all know that disgustingly jovial couple — the kind that finishes each other’s sentences, has a seemingly never ending bank of stored up inside jokes, constant witty-banter battles, and completely appropriate, genuinely sweet shows of affection (not that dude who’s hand is permanently glued to his partner’s ass — more Lily and Marshalls please!)

The underlying message of today’s infographic is: happy individuals ultimately make up happy couples. The more positivity both people can bring to the relationship, the happier the couple will be. Unexpected compliments, flowers, shared adventures, and probing conversations are sure to grant you access to the elite group of happy couples. Criticism, close-mindedness, and sadly children (sixty-seven percent of of couples report experiencing a big drop in marital dissatisfaction after the birth of their first child) may leave you feeling a little unloved and under-appreciated.

At the end of the day the best relationships take maintenance and hard work. They can fall apart as quickly as they start — or worse become unfeeling and complacent.

Or just take the sage wisdom of Nick Hornby: “It’s no good pretending that any relationship has a future if your record collections disagree violently or if your favorite films wouldn’t even speak to each other if they met at a party.” [Via]

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Over or Under? The Great Toilet Paper Debate [Infographic]

February 11, 2014 |  by  |  Funny, Lifestyle  |  1 Comment
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How do you orient your toilet paper? Over, under, don’t care at all? It’s a question that 50% of the population thinks about, yet seemingly never talks about. At first thought, this subject might be brushed off as trivial, however it could have psychological implications that are anything but.

It wasn’t until 1879 when toilet paper rolls began being mass produced. Before this blessed day people used, well, one can only imagine. However, this feat of human genius raised one of the most important questions of our time: why do some people orient toilet paper rolls “over”, others “under” and a third, enigmatic group who seem to not care either way?

Well, some studies suggest that the answer is more than coincidence. For instance, people who orient their rolls “over” are more organized and characterized as over-achievers. Think your older sibling who works harder and is more successful than you. This group represents 70 percent of the people who actually care that much about toilet paper.

The remaining 30 percent of this peculiar study group are the “unders”. Characterized as “laid-back”, “artistic”, and “dependable”. This could mean many things. If you were at a potluck, it might trigger your internal hippie-alarm system, or it could just mean that you’re hanging out with friendly people who can keep a secret.

At any rate, next time you are at a friends house, pot-luck, party, pay attention to the toilet paper roll, it might divulge the secrets of someones personality. Then again, it might not mean shit. [Via]

 

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The Science of Social Timing [Infographic]

February 11, 2014 |  by  |  Social Media  |  No Comments
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Let’s be honest — likes feel good, retweets feel good, the virtual world’s affirmations of — “Hey dude, you rock! Here’s a white number in a red box to let you know we care!” — feel great in the ever increasing digital world we live in.

Wait, that’s really sad — I can’t believe I’m saying this, maybe we should re-consider the ramifications of social conditioning through social med — Holy shit! Look at all these likes my Instagram photo got! — Now what was I talking about?

In all seriousness though, many of you have probably experienced the pain of not getting love on a post you thought was pure gold. Maybe you really ‘zang’ some politician, or put that cocky reality star on blast. So you post. Half an hour passes, 2 hours, 3 hours… “Three likes?! How do I only have three likes?! That post was interesting, witty, hip, what went wrong?” You idiot! You posted at 2:00 pm, who is on Facebook at 2:00 pm? Nobody (or at least nobody employed). Pretty soon your post will be removed from everyone’s news feed due to lack of traffic, and wind up in the Facebook graveyard along with grandma posts and your high-school friend’s Crossfit photos.

Look, if you’re just boring, dull and uninteresting — none of this will help you. I’m sorry. But, if you aren’t those things, (and if you’re reading this, you’re not! Yay!) give this infographic a look, and get the most out of your social media activities. [Via]

 

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Origins of Common UI Symbols [Infographic]

February 10, 2014 |  by  |  Tech  |  No Comments
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From ancient Egypt to present day, human beings have crafted written symbols for the purpose of simply and elegantly representing information. As we have progressed into the digital age, we still use symbols (I believe to an even greater degree) to express and identify common actions and ideas. When we encounter any one of these symbols we often don’t even consider their origins. They become so associated with the idea that they represent, we lose the story of where they came from. Well, this particular infographic looks to demystify a certain sect of of these symbols that we use – User Interface symbols, or UI symbols.

Take for instance, the power button. We see this symbol everywhere. From starting a Toyota Prius to powering on your computer, this symbol of on/off has its roots tied all the way back to World War II rotary switches, toggles and power buttons. In binary, the symbol 1 was used to represent ‘on’ and 0 conversely meaning ‘off’. In 1973 the International Electrotechnical Commission codified the image of a broken 0 with a line (or 1) through it as a ‘standby power state’. This was later altered to mean simply ‘power’ and has been used worldwide ever since to symbolize this.

The rest of the infographic similarly and succinctly describes other UI symbols and their origins quite well. Enjoy the lost stories of the symbols on our machines.

[via]

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