A Lifetime of Brushing [infographic]

October 6, 2014 |  by  |  Health, Lifestyle  |  No Comments
Pinterest

The dentist seems to give me bad news every time I go in to see him. For instance, when I went to the dentist around May for a standard teeth cleaning, he told me I needed to get my bottom two wisdom teeth removed. He assured me that on a scale of 1-10, my extractions would be a 2, since they weren’t impacted or anything. Easy peasy, I thought to myself. Naturally, I was wrong; it turned out I needed three teeth removed. Obviously, eating was a little difficult after that, but nothing significantly bad happened. I was still mad about the third tooth, though. A little warning would have been nice.

I don’t hold it against the dentist for giving me bad news. I suppose he’s only trying to help. I do get tired of the look he gives me when he tells me I’ve got a cavity, or warns me that I’ll soon get one if I’m not careful. And it’s not like I don’t take care of my teeth. (Alright, I could probably take better care of them.)

I must confess I’m not a fan of flossing, but apparently, neither is the average American. Which is bad, because according to this infographic, you miss cleaning 40 percent of the tooth surface when you don’t floss… Gross! It also turns out the average person doesn’t brush long enough. Dentists recommend brushing two minutes in the morning and two minutes at night.

If you’re not convinced flossing is important yet, scroll to the bottom of the infographic to read why brushing and flossing is so beneficial. Now go brush your teeth!

[via]

A Lifetime of Brushing - Infographic

Share This Infographic

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest

Get Free Infographics Delivered to your Inbox

SUBSCRIBE BY RSS


40 Ways to Stay Creative [infographic]

October 5, 2014 |  by  |  Business, Education  |  1 Comment
Pinterest

Being and staying creative is important in all areas of your work and personal life. Everyone can be creative in any type of job and situation. Creativity comes in all shapes and forms, but sometimes we don’t feel inspired or cannot make the right decisions. Well there are things you can do to refuel, recharge, and increase your creativity. This infographic has 40 methods which you can use to stay creative.

There are several methods I already practice, but several others are new. Some of these methods are more involved than others. Like number 38 – eat different cuisine; I always wanted to try Indian food. Some of the methods you can do by yourself, or with someone else. Number 11 – be around creative people, you would definitely need to try. Face to face conversation helps in many parts of your life, not just creativity. Some are a little scary, like number 20 – getting feedback from peers.

Some methods are common sense and easily done. Like number 21 – listening to music, has been a favorite one of mine since high school.  Number 31 – take naps, is very refreshing, but it is too bad it cannot be done at work. Another favorite of mine I do a lot is number 8 – read books. As you read the different ways, which method are you will to try to spark you creativity?

[via]

Share This Infographic

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest

Stress Related Health Problems [infographic]

October 4, 2014 |  by  |  Health  |  No Comments
Pinterest

Stress affects everyone. Living in such a high-octane society, the standards and results demanded of people have become absurd. So much so that our brains literally cannot handle it sometimes. The increase in mental health awareness has brought “stress” and the negative effect it has on our lives into the limelight of psychological, and even anatomical health discussions of recent years.

According to today’s infographic, stress is “a condition or feeling experienced when a person perceives that demands exceed the personal and social resources the individual is able to mobilize.” Although it is difficult to decipher the exact scientific workings that stress plays on our body, over the last half of the 20th century and well into the 21st century, more and more studies conducted by psychological scholars and practitioners have linked memory loss, heart problems, high blood pressure, and even physical pain (i.e. fibromyalgia) to “stress.”

The causes of stress varies from person to person. Most common causes stem from emotional/spiritual misalignment rooted in anxiety from work, school, or relationships. Traumatic events – such as the death of a family member, military combat, or childhood traumatic grief – are also main contributors. Stress is not entirely detrimental, though. According to Hans Selve, a pioneer in stress research, “stress is not necessarily something bad – it all depends on how you take it. The stress of exhilarating, creative successful work is beneficial, while that of failure, humiliation or infection is detrimental.” Whatever way stress affects you as a person, be it motivation (like Hans Selve), mental illness, or even physical health problems, there are ways to coping with it. Check out today’s infographic for some coping methods and statistics on the effect stress plays on your daily life. [via]

tpsychologystress-620x3582

Share This Infographic

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest

The New Lawyer [infographic]

October 3, 2014 |  by  |  Education  |  No Comments
Pinterest

Hello again, Internet. It’s your favorite infographic writer, Stewart. I know that I’ve remained somewhat mysterious and reclusive (as most great writers do), and so I thought I’d take the opportunity to open up and share more about my personal life. All of my millions of fans across the globe have been dying for a piece such as this, so here’s some meat for the wolves. I am currently studying English at Texas Tech University, and I plan on attending law school afterwards. For this reason, I have chosen this infographic as a personal interest. But if you, like me, are interested in attending law school, or even if you’re not, this infographic will help you see the pros of attending.

Employment for law school graduates is expected to increase 10 percent by the year 2020. Which means that your chances of employment will increase significantly in an already highly employable position. In fact, the number of law school graduates has been steadily  increasing since the 1970s. Law school requires a lot of effort, but in the end, it definitely pays for itself.

With the constant changing of laws and creation of innumerable law practices, becoming a lawyer is a great idea for anyone with the right mindset. There are several types of law that one could choose to practice, so it is also a very versatile course of study. So I urge you, Internet, to explore this field more thoroughly. [via]

 

the-new-lawyer-fit

Share This Infographic

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest

William Shakespeare in Statistics [infographic]

October 2, 2014 |  by  |  Mind-Blowing  |  1 Comment
Pinterest

William Shakespeare, as I’m sure you all know (because if you don’t, you need to climb out from under whatever rock you’ve been living underneath for the past few centuries, and rocket yourself back to planet Earth), is undoubtedly the most well-known playwright in the history of the English language. Here are some interesting statistics you might not have known about his life.

He was born on the 23rd of April. Fifty-two years later, he died on the 23rd of April.

Shakespeare created almost 3,000 English words. How many times have you created a word that stuck? He once used over 7,000 different words in a single play. Which, by the way, the average English speaker only uses 500 to 1,000 different words in an entire day.

He’s also popular enough to have 80 known variations of the spelling of his name.

In Shakespeare’s lifetime, he wrote 37 plays and 154 other works that we are aware of – which is an insane amount of writing.

He wrote one-tenth of the most quoted lines in the English language. Some of them you might use every day and have no idea that ol’ Bill himself was the person who coined it.

Now, all of you may know who Shakespeare is, but if you’ve never sat down and read one of his works, I implore you to do so. It may take a lot of work, but it’s worth it just to say, “Yep, I read Hamlet, and understood every last word in it.” [via]

 

WilliamShakespeare_4f6a8fac93254_w680

 

 

 

 

Share This Infographic

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest