How Millennials Feel About Data Targeting and Online Privacy [infographic]

February 1, 2014 |  by  |  Internet  |  No Comments
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With the turn of the new millennium, young adults were cleverly dubbed Millennials. Millennials are strange people: a generation that just kind of missed out on a lot, while being given the burden of experiencing, first-hand, the tragedy of the economic crisis. They milked every last bit of artistic ability and creativity right out of the nineties and, in turn, produced Facebook and Spotify. This is the generation that learned how to make money by exploiting human interest.

I just made a lot of that up, but let’s see what Millennials have to say about advertising on the internet!

Have you ever been on the internet, and somehow, the ads lining the sides of the page seemed strangely specific to you? It couldn’t be anything other than wizards, right? Wrong. It’s personalized targeting that analyzes your activity on certain websites and appropriately generates ads based on your interests. (Let your fear of this kind of technology becoming sentient sink in for a minute.) 67% of Millennials say that they’re cool with this as long as it’s relevant information. 64% said that it just makes them feel uneasy. I agree with the latter. I mean, there’s really nothing private on the internet, but it would be nice to not feel like I’m being watched.

95% of Millennials claim to have taken action to protect their online privacy, which is good. Everyone needs to be looking after themselves, especially on the internet, since identity theft is a thing. That still blows my mind. Someone can take your life away over the internet. At least 95% of the Millennials are safe, right? [via]

 

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The Network of Possibility [infographic]

January 31, 2014 |  by  |  Business, Internet  |  No Comments
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What is worse than no computers? Slow computers. In a business, computers should always run fast and efficiently, it is not fair for the employer or the employee for work to be done at a slow rate just because of the computer’s speed. At my job at the City of San Marcos I am often asked to verify zoning for different parcels of land. Theoretically all this should take is me typing in an address and quickly finding its zoning, so maybe 10 seconds, but the computers are so slow that it is more efficient for me to use the physical book of zoning than the Map on the computer. This process ends up taking me a full 3 minutes.

I wonder if other, non-computer jobs have to deal with similar issues. Working as a chef, are there any kitchens that have stove tops that warm up extremely slow, therefore the efficiency of the kitchen goes down? Maybe, someone working in auto mechanics happens to have the drill that works slower than everyone else and they take twice as long to change a tire. What if a NASCAR driver got stuck with a slow car? I know what you’re thinking, “the point of NASCAR is to be fast, so that would never happen” but isn’t a point of business to be fast, efficient and get the job done? Slow computers shouldn’t be a hindrance to this.
[via]

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The Essential: Forex Review in 2013 [infographic]

January 30, 2014 |  by  |  Business  |  1 Comment
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The saying, “money never sleeps” is only exemplified by today’s interesting infographic. Brought to you by AxiTrader, (a company made by traders, FOR traders), todays infographic outlines the Forex year in review for 2013.

The review first outlines 2013’s major financial events, then goes on to include: currency performance, summary of the major currency pairs, year-end economic stats for each major country, stock market stats, and year-end interest rates.

It’s interesting to see how money fluctuates throughout the year, and how any little event can really shake up the system. Understanding how money circulates can really give you a heads up if you’re a banker, trader, or just looking to invest in something.

Check out today’s infographic and the hyperlink to gain further insight about trading, AxiTrader, and Forex! [via]

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50 Things Every Traveller Should Know [infographic]

January 29, 2014 |  by  |  Travel  |  3 Comments
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Have you been lusting over Pinterest pictures of Barcelona recently? Or dreaming of a chance meeting with the elves in Iceland? Maybe the undertaking of planning your backpacking trip across Europe has left you exhilarated, but at the same time, feeling a bit like a caricature of ‘the ignorant American’.

Have no fear! Today’s infographic shows us fifty things that will make us all more culturally aware of the countries we visit and better travelers in general. For starters, it’s not a bad idea to know the names of at least eight cathedrals or churches in Europe; also, know that Russians like their vodka straight — no mixers, please.

Be sure to know the difference in personal space in South and North America — South Americans like to get close when engaging in conversation, while North Americans may view this behavior as an invasion of personal space; wear clothes with lots of pockets when boarding a flight (if pockets are utilized correctly you could find yourself with an extra carry-on!); and go ahead and memorize your passport number — this can come in handy when you’re checking into your hotel, or renting a car, or when you’re filling out your customs form on the flight home and the exact location of your passport in your oversized/overstuffed bag escapes you.

Before you score a plane ticket, check out today’s infographic, and bask in your new-found knowledge of the world. [Via]

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The Oxford Comma [infographic]

January 28, 2014 |  by  |  Business, Education  |  9 Comments
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There’s this little thing in the grammar world called an Oxford comma. Basically, it is the comma placed before the conjunction in a series of words in a sentence. And yes, it’s totally confusing and the cause of much debate.

Let me try to break it down for you. Here are two sentences, one of which uses the Oxford comma:

a. After it happened, I only talked to my therapists, my mom and my dad.

b. After it happened, I only talked to my therapists, my mom, and my dad.

In the first sentence, ‘I’ is implying that the mom and dad are the therapists, making it seem like only two other people are involved. The second sentence clarifies that the subject is speaking about three or more people.

Neither of these are incorrect, depending on who you talk to. If you ask most grammar enthusiasts, the Oxford comma is accepted and encouraged for clarification. But if you are dealing with someone who works in the news industry and uses the AP Stylebook, the sentence is correct if you omit the last comma entirely. As both of these things, I personally think the Oxford comma is valid in certain instances and I use it when necessary.

For those of you who aren’t really interested in grammar but are a fan of good music, check out the song of the same name by one of my favorite bands, Vampire Weekend. [via]

 

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