Kids and STEM [infographic]

October 16, 2014 |  by  |  Education  |  No Comments
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Science is the future. And today’s children are tomorrow’s adults. And I’m a young adult writing for DailyInfographic, but I still care about the progress of technology. Science, technology, engineering, and math occupations are some of the most challenging yet rewarding fields to pursue. Jobs within these realms provide an atmosphere that promotes the union of exploratory creativity with focused practice of standard knowledge, generating some of the most intelligent individuals around. And the entire world benefits from the work of these people.

Almost 50 percent of economic growth in the past 50 years can be attributed to advances in technology alone. And every second, the world is only becoming more and more technological. Engineering jobs are expected to grow, and so engineering degrees are in high demand.

But even if after receiving some kind of STEM degree, one was to decide to follow another career path, he/she would most likely receive higher earnings than someone with a non-STEM degree. Most people who pursue a STEM degree, however, choose to do so well before college anyway. About 93 percent of U.S. parents believe that STEM education is a must. And even though I am not a parent, I could not agree more.

Science is the most important study of all. It is the mother to all other subjects. It is essentially just learning. We, as human beings, are obliged to answer our own questions.  Where did we come from? Why are we here? Where are we going? These questions give us purpose, and we must fulfill that purpose. [DestinationScience]

 

DS infographic

 

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The Growth of Allotment Gardens [infographic]

October 15, 2014 |  by  |  Environmental, Health, Lifestyle  |  No Comments
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For those of you unfamiliar with the concept of allotment gardens, today’s infographic takes a look at the benefits and details of owning and/or renting your own sustainable, personal garden plot. Allotment gardens have not historically been a staple of American culture, but overseas they have been a thriving source of natural, homegrown fruits, vegetables, and livestock to city dwellers for centuries.

Following the Industrial Revolution in Europe during the 18th century, once-rural workers moved to cities, and were forced to leave behind their agricultural farming practices. In attempts to find an affordable source of nutrition while living in cities, these new urban dwellers began to build gardens on the outskirts of cities to supply themselves with a cheap, sustainable food source.

Today, allotment gardens exist mainly to provide European urban populations with a source of organic food unharmed by pesticides and chemicals used by large-scale produce distributors. According to today’s infographic, when used efficiently, allotment plots can “provide enough land to feed a family of four for a year.” At an average rate between £25-£125 ($40 -$200) per year to rent, allotment gardens provide those seeking to live a healthier, more organic lifestyle with an affordable, personal space to do so.

Unfortunately, allotments have been decreasing in popularity and frequency. Rapid urbanization and technological advancements have decreased the number of allotments by 80 percent in the last 75 years. With the green initiative of modern day society though, allotment gardens have a chance to make a comeback. If re-popularized, allotment gardens can offer a small-scale solution to modern day environmental and health concerns. Check out today’s infographic for more info.

[Compost Direct]

The Growth of Allotments [infographic]

 

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How Color Has Changed [infographic]

October 14, 2014 |  by  |  Entertainment, Recreation  |  2 Comments
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Hi. My name’s Aisling, and I like to color. [Hi, Aisling.]

I’ve been a color-er since I was very little. My grandmother firmly believed in maintaining a stockpile of coloring books and crayons. Which is AWESOME! Thanks, grandma!

Anyway, since I’ve been coloring for so long, I’m clearly an expert on the matter. (Just go along with it.) I have always preferred the Crayola crayon over any other. I’ve tried RoseArts and store brands, but I just think Crayola is the brand to use. There’s just something about them. Not to mention the great names for some of their best colors; ‘Cerulean’ is a favorite of mine.

Needless to say, when I stumbled over this interactive infographic, I was ecstatic. The Crayola Color Chart shows where the brand started, and how far they’ve come in terms of variety for their colors, shades, and names.

Now go pull out that crayon stash I know you’ve got hidden away (or colored pencils/markers if that’s more your thing.) It might be time to add some new colors to your rainbow.

[via]

Click on the image below to see the interactive visualization, featuring the names of the crayons.

crayola_color_chart_bow

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11 Hotel Perks You Won’t Believe Exist [infographic]

October 13, 2014 |  by  |  Travel  |  No Comments
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I’ve been taking one or two trips around the US for the last four years. Because I’m a student, hotels are out of the question. Hostels are great – but some turn out to be run-down, filled with party-crazed teens. One of the best ways I’ve found to travel is with friends and family. Stay on their couch, or in an extra bedroom. Using credit card reward points for flights, ride shares, and trains, I’ve found actual transportation can be relatively cheap as well. But today’s infographic isn’t about budget travel – it’s about the 5-star hotel experience.

First off, there’s a ‘Hangover Concierge” at the Ritz New Orleans. Now as New Orleans was one of my destinations last year, I know too well the illness that seems to always strike a day after Bourbon Street. When I was last down there, I ended up in a barber’s chair in the middle of a club at 2 a.m. A shot of whiskey and a haircut for $10. Wonderful night, but the next day was another story. Although my hair looked great, my body did not. Sugary drinks galore lead to headaches even more.

All of the perks on this list are a little extreme, but high-society has and always will be extreme. When there is money to be made with some outrageous idea, someone will do it. [Via]

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How to Write Better Emails [infographic]

October 12, 2014 |  by  |  Business, Internet  |  No Comments
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Emails are more important than you might think. When applying for jobs, they can be just as important as an impressive resume and well-written cover letter, especially when you’re only corresponding electronically. According to today’s infographic, the majority of daily email comes from business correspondence. So, think about that the next time you include a smiley emoji at the end of a sentence. (It sucks, I know. I love them, too.)

One of the first things you should consider when drafting a new email, or when sending an email to a potential employer from an account you created in high school, is what your email address says about you. We’ve all had that one (or two) email addresses or screen names that are slightly embarrassing. For the longest time, I had a Yahoo address that was hyperhoney2008, and a Gmail that was even more embarrassing. I don’t know what I was thinking. Instead, it’s best to keep it simple. Using your name is good. Since going through college and learning the importance of ‘personal branding,’ I’ve changed every account to aislingclare27, so that my online presence is the same across the board.

Another important thing to think about when corresponding online is what the content of your email says about you. Subject lines should be kept straightforward and to the point. Keywords are important. The infographic shows that 35 percent of people decide to read an email based on the subject line alone.

The rest of your email’s content should also be kept short and direct. As a rule of thumb, don’t use more than 150 words. Your writing should be concise, and you should use proper grammar and punctuation. Potential employers may write you off for a position if you can’t write a simple email.

There are a lot of things to keep in mind when composing emails, and this infographic provides several other tips for writing better ones. If you’re following up on a job application via email, be sure to check these out and utilize them to your advantage.

[via]

emails

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